Magnesium

Magnesium plays a role in over 300 enzymatic reactions within the body, including the metabolism of food, synthesis of fatty acids and proteins, and the transmission of nerve impulses.
The following health benefits have been associated with magnesium.
  • Bone health. Magnesium is important for bone formation. …
  • Calcium absorption. Calcium and magnesium are important for maintaining bone health and preventing osteoporosis. …
  • Diabetes. …
  • Heart health. …
  • Migraine headaches. …
  • Premenstrual syndrome. …
  • Relieving anxiety.

Benefits

spinach

Spinach is a good source of magnesium.

Magnesium is one of seven essential macrominerals.

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Carrot Fritters

Screen Shot 2018-08-22 at 9.27.23 amINGREDIENTS
large eggs
Kosher salt and pepper
12 oz. carrots (about 3 large)
1/4 c. panko bread crumbs/ gluten free BC / Polenta/Buckwheat Flakes /Quinoa Flakes 
scallions, thinly sliced
red chile, seeded for less heat and thinly sliced
1 c. fresh cilantro
2 tbsp. fresh lime juice
3 tbsp. olive oil
2 oz. feta cheese, crumbled
Green salad, for serving

 

DIRECTIONS
  1. In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs and 1/2 teaspoon each salt and pepper.
  2. Using a food processor with the large grater attachment, coarsely grate the carrots. Add them to the bowl with the eggs and toss to coat. Fold in the panko, then 2 scallions, the chile, and cilantro.
  3. In a small bowl, combine the lime juice, 1 tablespoon oil, and remaining scallion.
  4. Heat a large cast-iron skillet over medium heat, then add 1 tablespoon oil. Drop 6 spoons of the carrot mixture into the skillet and cook until golden brown and crisp, about 3 minutes per side; transfer to a wire rack. Repeat with the remaining oil and carrot mixture, adding more oil to the skillet, if necessary.
  5. Gently stir the feta into the lime-scallion mixture. Serve over the carrot fritters and serve with green salad, if desired.

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Winter Chicken & Egg Soup

thumbnail_IMG_3369Ingredients

1Kg Chicken drumsticks or Thighs

1 carrot diced

1/4-1/2  Leek chopped

1 red Capsicum diced 

1 1/2 Tablespoon chicken Stock

1 Beaten egg

Method 

1:  Place chicken and all other ingredients into a saucepan and fill with filtered water and  bring to boil and then simmer.

2: When ready  take the drumsticks out and then shred or slice thigh. Add back to the  soup and simmer.

3:Add beaten egg  and stir through until egg is cooked.

Serve with slice of lemon and  fresh piece of fermented Sour dough with some yummy Grass fed butter !!!!

Vitamin D 3

 

Vitamin D is widely known for its role in calcium homeostasis and maintenance of skeletal health, and in addition is becoming increasingly known to be crucial to many areas of health and chronic disease prevention. Activated vitamin D functions more as a hormone than a vitamin, with roles in immune modulation, insulin and thyroid hormone secretion, cell cycle regulation, cardiovascular function and the control of inflammation. Due to its wide range of actions, and the high prevalence of vitamin D3 deficiency, supplementation with a stable form of vitamin D3 has the potential to benefit a large section of the population.

CLINICAL APPLICATIONS

KEY ACTIONS

• Regulate calcium absorption and homeostasis

• Promotes bone mineralisation

• Supports immune defence

• Promotes immune regulation

• Regulates heart muscle function

• Regulates cell cycles

• Regulates endocrine function

o insulin secretion

o thyroid hormone secretion

KEY APPLICATIONS

• Individuals at risk of vitamin D deficiency

• Bone and muscle health

o Poor bone mineral density / osteoporosis

o To reduce risk of fracture

o To reduce risk of fall in elderly due to poor muscle strength

• Chronic disease

o Inflammatory and autoimmune diseases

o Multiple sclerosis

o Cardiovascular disease risk

o Hypertension

o Diabetes mellitus

o Cancer risk

o Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome

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NIGHTSHADES & INFLAMMATION

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WHAT ARE NIGHTSHADES???

You may have heard of the term “deadly nightshade” referring to a plant called belladonna, which was used as a poison in ancient times.
The Latin name for this family of plants is Solanaceae, because all of them produce an alkaloid compound called solanine.

Solanine is concentrated in the leaves and stems, and that’s one of the reasons we don’t eat those parts of the plants, it is a chemical which can cause symptoms of poisoning in humans if ingested in large quantities.

A big salad of tomato or potato leaves might actually contain enough solanine to give you an upset stomach.

Perhaps you’ve also heard that potatoes with sprouting eyes are poisonous. That’s because potatoes that have started to sprout or have developed a greenish tint to their skins are often higher in solanine.  It’s best not to eat them.

Did you know they are inflammatory? Lesser known are the commonly eaten vegetables in the same nightshade family.
They aren’t deadly, but they contain enough toxins to cause inflammation in some people, particularly those with an autoimmune disease.
According to the Arthritis Foundation  the belief that eating nightshade vegetables worsens arthritis is a myth. They claim people with arthritis may benefit from the high nutrition content in nightshades.
 
View research paper : “Pigmented potato consumption alters oxidative stress and inflammatory damage in men.”
Problems with nightshades are mostly seen in Caucasians and is mostly genetic.
Often, we don’t realize just how much, until we stop eating them:

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